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ENDOMETRIAL POLYP

ENDOMETRIAL POLYPS (UTERINE POLYPS)

Endometrial polyps (uterine polyps) are sometimes single, sometimes multiple and mostly benign lesions that develop from the innermost layer of the uterus. Estrogen hormone is held responsible for the development of endometrial polyps. To put it in non-medical terms, polyps are benign lentil- or chickpea-shaped pieces of flesh that develop inside the uterus. There is a possibility that it will turn into cancer, but it is low (5/1000). The possibility of turning into cancer depends on the patient’s age, whether he or she has a chronic disease such as diabetes and hypertension, and his weight. The probability of developing cancer in older and overweight women is much higher than in young people.
It is observed frequently because it is thought to be intrauterine polyps. 15 out of every 100 women have endometrial polyps. It rarely appears under the age of 20. They are observed at a higher rate especially between the ages of 40-50.

HOW DO ENDOMETRIAL POLYPS GIVE SYMPTOMS?

Endometrial polyps often do not cause symptoms. When it does show symptoms, it most often manifests itself with irregular vaginal bleeding. When women with menstrual irregularities are examined, endometrial polyps are detected in 30% of them. Polyps may also manifest themselves with brown discharge observed before and after menstruation. Polyps do not cause pain, but they can cause irregular bleeding and cause menstrual pain. Brown discharge can also be observed in other diseases. Therefore, in the presence of such a symptom, the patient should be evaluated by an experienced gynecologist.

Polyps can develop in different sizes, in different numbers and in different places within the uterus. Because they cause irregular bleeding, they create a spiral-like foreign body reaction, can block sperm passage, prevent the embryo from attaching to the uterus, and ultimately prevent pregnancy. Rarely, pregnancy can occur even when polyps are present. However, if it is known that there are polyps, it would be appropriate to remove the polyps before planning a pregnancy to increase the chance of pregnancy.

HOW IS ENDOMETRIAL POLYP DIAGNOSED?

In order to diagnose endometrial polyp, an advanced ultrasound device and an experienced gynecologist are needed. In cases where a definitive diagnosis cannot be made with ultrasound, the diagnosis can be confirmed with a test performed by administering physiological saline into the uterus (SIS). Uterine polyps can be recognized by taking a uterine film (HSG). Endometrial polyps can also be seen with hysteroscopy performed for diagnostic purposes.

WHAT HAPPENS IF ENDOMETRIAL POLYPS ARE NOT TREATED?

Polyps can develop in different sizes, in different numbers and in different places within the uterus. Because they cause irregular bleeding, they create a spiral-like foreign body reaction, can block sperm passage, prevent the embryo from attaching to the uterus, and ultimately prevent pregnancy. Rarely, pregnancy can occur even when polyps are present. However, if it is known that there are polyps, it would be appropriate to remove the polyps before planning a pregnancy to increase the chance of pregnancy.

HOW ARE ENDOMETRIAL POLYPS TREATED?

Hysteroscopy is used in the treatment of endometrial polyps. It is performed by inserting a long, thin camera into the uterus. Polyps are first examined with a device called hysteroscopy, which allows us to see the inside of the uterus, and then they are cut from the stem using either scissors or energy current. The removed piece is examined by the pathology unit for risk assessment. The polyp can also be removed from the uterus by curettage. However, since this method is a blind procedure, it is impossible to understand how much of the polyp has been removed and how much is left behind.

Polyp surgery (hysteroscopy) is performed as a day surgery. There is no need to stay in hospital for a long time. 6 hours of fasting is sufficient before surgery. The operation is performed with sedation. The process takes approximately 10-15 minutes.
The patient can leave the hospital within 3-4 hours after waking up and regaining consciousness. He can continue his normal life the next day. You may experience a small amount of bleeding for a few days after the procedure. There is a risk of recurrence of polyps, so periodic checks are appropriate. After polyp surgery, menstrual irregularities improve, breakthrough bleeding disappears, and the amount of bleeding decreases. Sexuality can begin after bleeding ends after hysteroscopy.


Endometrial polyps cannot be treated with strange methods such as herbal treatment, onion juice cure, cupping and aroma therapy. These methods cause loss of money and time.

Tamoxifen, a drug that should be used for 5 years in the treatment of breast cancer, has an effect on the endometrium and causes thickening of the endometrium. It is important to determine the degree of this thickening and whether there are accompanying polyps. Because uterine cancer may develop due to Tamoxifen. The normal endometrial thickness at menopause is 4 mm. If there is endometrial thickening and especially if there is excessive or irregular bleeding, an endometrial biopsy must be taken and the removed material must be sent for pathological examination.

If you have irregular bleeding, heavy menstrual bleeding, brown spotting before or after menstruation, intermittent bleeding between two menstrual periods, and difficulty getting pregnant, you should be examined for endometrial polyps.